STEP 3: NOTETAKING


Part I: Basic Notecard Structure

You need to buy a package of index cards. You will be writing two different types of notecards: bibliography cards and note cards.

BIBLIOGRAPHY CARDS:

For every source that you use for your papers, you should make up a bibliography card. Your bibliography card should contain all the important information you will need to write your bibliography. Each card should also get a letter, called a source code. Put the source code in the upper right hadn corner of your bibliography card. You will use the source code again on your note cards.

Sample bibliography card for a book:

Remember to record:

NOTE CARDS:

  1. Write the source code in the top right corner.
  2. Write the subtopic that the notes deal with at the top of the notecard. This subtopic should come from your preliminary outline. These subtopics can be general. As you do more research, the subtopics of your paper may expand or change. The subtopic is called the slug.
  3. Write your notes underneath the slug.
  1. Put the page number at the top of each notecard. You need this for your footnotes/endnotes.
  2. Sample note card:

 


Part II: Taking Notes on a Notecard

ORIGINAL SOURCE PASSAGE

Its repetitive words, phrases, and patterns give to the flowing rhythms a wonderfully resonant and noble beauty. The poetic expression of the impact of the scenic landscape upon the innermost recesses of the poet's mind was as spontaneous as it was powerful. The poem took shape while his feelings were overflowing with excess of joy and while his faith in the power of Nature to dispel "fear or pain or grief" was still at high tide. In after years he qualified and subdued his pronouncements in "Tintern Abbey." But he never lost delight in the simple converse of Nature or his faith that all created things can bring pleasure to the sensitive person impelled by love or praise.

Russell Noyes, William Wordsworth. New York: Twayne Publishers, Inc., p. 68.

 

DIRECT QUOTATION

"Tintern Abbey"                             C 68
"Its repetitive words, phrases, and patterns give to the flowing rhythms a wonderfully resonant and noble beauty. The poetic expression of the impact of the scenic landscape upon the innermost recesses of the poet’s mind was as spontaneous as it was powerful."

 

PARAPHRASE

"Tintern Abbey"                             C 68
"Tintern Abbey" reflects the powerful emotions of near ecstasy Wordsworth felt at the time. The poem’s content and form are an outgrowth of the effect of the natural landscape on the poet and his belief that nature could shield humankind from the sadness and pain of life. As he grew older he was less enthusiastic about the ability of Nature to soothe the troubled spirit.

 

SUMMARY

"Tintern Abbey"                             C 68
the rhythm and phrasing of "Tintern Abbey" reflects the strong feeling developed in Wordsworth as he reacted to Nature’s landscapes later his belief in the power of nature was less fervent, although he always loved the simple joys it brought

 

Please complete the worksheet on note-taking.

For a more in-depth discussion on note-taking, click here.